Live Your Creed

I'd rather see a sermon than to hear one any day.
I'd rather one walk with me than just to show the way.
The eye is better pupil and more willing that the  ear.
 
Advice may be misleading but examples are always clear.
And the very best of teachers are the ones who live their creed,
For to see good put into action is what everybody needs.

I can soon learn to do it if you let me see it done.
I can watch your hand in motion but your tongue too fast may run.
And the lectures you deliver may be very fine and true.
 
But I'd rather get my lesson by observing what you do.
For I may misunderstand you and the fine advice you give.
But I'd rather get my lesson by observing what you do.
 
For I may misunderstand you and the fine advice you give
But there's no misunderstanding how you act and how you live.

- Zelenn Deis


The New Master

The new Master stood and looked at his Lodge,
The same old few were there,
The ones he knew he could depend upon
The work of the Lodge to share.

But where are the ones we've raised these years,
Who craved to be Masons true?
To whom we've given so much of our time
In degree work, guiding them through.

The new Master stood and looked at his Lodge
And Silently he thought::
Where have we failed that they're not here
In Spite of the truth we've taught.

Did they really want friendship and brotherly love
As they claimed when they knocked at our door?
Or did they just join, our symbol to wear.
And so don't come out anymore?

The new Master stood and looked at his Lodge
And said to the same old few:
"Come, Brothers, lets get them back-
Come we have work to do!"

And they went to work on the stay-at-homes,
And their efforts began to tell:
Old faces and new came out again,
And attendance started to swell.

The new Master stood and looked at his Lodge,
No longer worried and blue;
His sheep were back in the fold again,
Sharing the work there was to do.

      My Brother’s Keeper


Am I my brother’s keeper?
Yes I am
I am his voice when he can not speak
I am his strength when he is weak
Am I my brother’s keeper?
Yes I am
I am his provider when he is in need
I am his arms when he can not reach
Am I my brother’s keeper?
Yes I am
I am his justice when he is wronged
I am his friend when he is alone
Am I my brother’s keeper?
Yes I am
I am his courage when he is afraid
I am his comforter when he is dismayed
Am I my brother’s keeper?
Yes I am
I am his hope when he does not believe
I am his truth when he is deceived
Am I my brother’s keeper
Yes I am
I am his guide when he has gone astray
I am his aide if he needs help along the way
Am I my brother’s keeper
The answer is yes
I am him, I am her

I am my brother’s keeper

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892)




Do you just belong?

Are you an active member?
The kind who would be missed?
Or are you just contented
that your name is on the list?

Do you attend the meetings
and mingle with the flock?
Or do you meet in private
and criticize and knock?

Do you take an active part
to help the work along?
Or are you satisfied to be
the kind that just belongs?

Do you work on committees?
To this there is no trick;
or leave the work to just a few,
and talk about the click?

Please come to the meetings often,
and help with hand and heart.
Don't be just a member
but take an active part.

Think this over, members,
you know what's right from wrong.
Are you an active member,
or do you just belong?

The Master Has to Have Help

 An old man had secured the use of a vacant lot. He had dug out the weeds, removed the stones and rubbish, plowed it, harrowed it, planted seeds and cared for the plants until what had been a stony weed patch became a thing of beauty.

                One day the parson passed that way and entered into conversation with the old man, who was loosening the soil with his hoe and pushing it up around the roots of the plants.  The parson remarked, “Brudder Jackson, you and de Lord sure has worked miracles with this old vacant lot.” The man responded, “Yes suh,  pahson, yes suh, me and the Lord sure has done a fine job here; you ought to of seen all the weeds and stones and rubbish there wuz here when de Lord was looking after it all by hisself.”

 Freemasonry gives the Brother only the rough. Yes, it provides him with the vacant lot, with the implements, and even with the seed, but it is up to the Brother to do the plowing, the harrowing, the planting and the cultivating that will bring out the plants and the beauty. He must push the soil up and around the roots of the plants.

                The Master, working alone, can’t make Freemasonry to bloom in this lodge room, any more than the Lord was able to make a flower garden grow on the vacant lot without the help of the old man. Without the help of the Brethren there will be here only a weed patch strewn with stones and rubbish. There will be no beautiful plants, their roots carefully covered with rich soil.  

 

Bede, E. (1981). 3-5-7 Minute Talks on Freemasonry (Rev Edition). Richmond, VA: Macoy Publishing